Filtering Data in Evidence-Based Practice

A recent post described the evidence pyramid. Like anything else in science, there have been criticisms. Here I liken evidence-based practice to filtering coffee. Evidence needs filtering to remove the coffee grain and any impurities. The trouble is, if one filters a lot of times, there may be nothing left that’s worth drinking. Box 6.1Continue reading “Filtering Data in Evidence-Based Practice”

The Evidence Pyramid

The traditional evidence pyramid remains a useful heuristic device for evaluating scientific evidence in medicine and health care. The highest quality evidence in the top two levels of the pyramid is the most difficult to process. The lowest quality of evidence at the bottom two levels of the pyramid is the easiest to process. ThisContinue reading “The Evidence Pyramid”

ME/CFS and unhelpful beliefs

The Wessely School approach to ME/CFS and MUS hypothesizes a causative role for unhelpful beliefs (H1), deconditioning (H2), and biased attention (H3). The evidence related to these three hypotheses is reviewed in turn. Here I consider H1: that unhelpful beliefs cause, or exacerbate, the symptoms of ME/CFS and MUS. Future posts will review the evidenceContinue reading “ME/CFS and unhelpful beliefs”